White Burgundy

White Burgundy is 100% Chardonnay from the Burgundy region of France and is one of the many styles of Chardonnay
  (shar-dohn-AY)
Synonyms: Chardonnay, Morillon (Austria)

Wine Name: Chardonnay, Chablis, White Burgundy, Burgundy Villages names, Blanc de Blanc (for many sparkling wines)

Background: In a cool climate, the Chardonnay grape takes on apple and green plum aromas. It may have a steely, mineral taste, with a light to medium body and medium (+) to high acidity. The Chablis and Champagne districts of France would be examples of this. In aged bottles of older vintages, there might be a clover honey taste. Other white French Burgundies (all Chardonnay grape) might be the same except less minerally and flinty due to a different soil.

In warm or hot climates Chardonnay may produce melon, peach, banana, mango and fig aromas but which are not very pronounced. It will be a medium acid, medium to full bodied wine such as found in a California or South Australian Chardonnay. If the Chardonnay has undergone malolactic fermentation (an additional fermentation with bacteria rather than yeast) and been fermented in small oak barrels, it might have rich, creamy pear, fig, hazelnut and vanilla (from the oak) flavors, with a long, luxurious finish and not acidic tasting at all.

Chardonnay takes well to oak flavors obtained by fermenting and/or aging in oak barrels with various percentages of new, vanillin flavored wood. Oaked Chardonnay can be slight, light, medium or heavy in vanillin flavor depending upon the winemaking techniques used. Almost all of the time if oak is used, malolactic fermentation produces a softening, creaminess and the perception of low acidity.

Classic Brands and Sources: Many French White Burgundy producers; Australia – Cape Mentelle, Grosset. Leeuwin, Nepenthe, Plantagenet; USA – Chateau St Jean, Chateau Montelena, Aubert, Au Bon Climat, Hanzell, Kistler, Shafer, Marcassin, Chateau Ste Michelle, Kendall-Jackson, Newton, Beringer; New Zealand – Kumeu River, Babich, Cloudy Bay, Dry River, Vavasour, Villa Maria; Chile – Montes, Tabali, Viña Casablanca; Argentina – Lucca

Characteristics: Acidity (tartness) like a Granny Smith green apple, and an “apple” aroma and taste (yellow or green) are hallmarks of unoaked Chardonnay wine, but they lessen if oak is used in aging the wine. Malolactic fermentation is different than oak influence, although the malolactic bacteria and yeasts that convert tart malic acid to soft lactic acid, often come from oak barrels that have previously been used for aging (old oak). Thus Chardonnay wines can be chameleons of aroma and taste ranging from apple and lemon to tropical and buttery and toasty. It is important with Chardonnay wines to identify the style of the wine that the winemaker and terroir produced before recommending, pairing, or liking it.

Style #1 – Chablis style

Body – light

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry, minerally

Tannins – low

Style #2 – unoaked, warm climate

Body – light to medium (-)

Acidity – medium (+)

Sweetness – dry, fruity

Tannins – low

Style #3 – lightly oaked cool climate
(white Burgundy style)

Body – medium (-)

Acidity – medium

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – low

Style #4- lightly oaked warm climate

Body – medium

Acidity – medium (-)

Sweetness – dry, fruity

Tannins – medium (-) to medium (from the oak)

Style #5 – moderately oaked, warm climate

Body – medium(+) to full

Acidity – low

Sweetness – dry, but creamy

Tannins – medium (-) to medium (from the oak)

 

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Unoaked – Pairs with medium bodied acidic foods.
Oaked – Pairs well with medium-bodied dishes that are buttery, fatty, savory or roasted or smoky

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Unoaked – Pairs with fish, shellfish, chicken, pork and veal with citric and other acidic sauces; salads, sushi
Oaked – Pairs with heavier fish, shellfish, chicken, pork and veal with buttery, creamy or other savory sauces; pastas with buttery, pesto or cheese sauces, truffles, smoked salmon

Cheese Pairings:
Unoaked – Boursin herbed (cool climate), Brick, Derby, Feta (sheep’s milk), goat cheese, Gouda, Havarti, Majorero (Spanish hard goat cheese) Mahon, Bucheron (French goat cheese), dry Jack cheese, Cream (warm weather), Neufchatel , Saint -Felicien (French cow;s milk cheese), Raclette, Pave Affinois
Oaked – Mild cheddar, Chaumes, Double Glouchester (similar to mild cheddar),Gouda, Smoked Gouda, Manchego, Monterey Jack, Triple Creme, St André, St Nectaire Zamarano (Spanish sheep’s milk cheese), Brie and Camembert (with or without rinds)

Appetizer Pairings:

see Appetizers that Pair with Chardonnay

Chardonnay

  (shar-dohn-AY)
Synonyms: Chardonnay, Morillon (Austria)

Wine Name: Chardonnay, Chablis, White Burgundy, Burgundy Villages names, Blanc de Blanc (for many sparkling wines)

Background: In a cool climate, the Chardonnay grape takes on apple and green plum aromas. It may have a steely, mineral taste, with a light to medium body and medium (+) to high acidity. The Chablis and Champagne districts of France would be examples of this. In aged bottles of older vintages, there might be a clover honey taste. Other white French Burgundies (all Chardonnay grape) might be the same except less minerally and flinty due to a different soil.

In warm or hot climates Chardonnay may produce melon, peach, banana, mango and fig aromas but which are not very pronounced. It will be a medium acid, medium to full bodied wine such as found in a California or South Australian Chardonnay. If the Chardonnay has undergone malolactic fermentation (an additional fermentation with bacteria rather than yeast) and been fermented in small oak barrels, it might have rich, creamy pear, fig, hazelnut and vanilla (from the oak) flavors, with a long, luxurious finish and not acidic tasting at all.

Chardonnay takes well to oak flavors obtained by fermenting and/or aging in oak barrels with various percentages of new, vanillin flavored wood. Oaked Chardonnay can be slight, light, medium or heavy in vanillin flavor depending upon the winemaking techniques used. Almost all of the time if oak is used, malolactic fermentation produces a softening, creaminess and the perception of low acidity.

Classic Brands and Sources: Many French White Burgundy producers; Australia – Cape Mentelle, Grosset. Leeuwin, Nepenthe, Plantagenet; USA – Chateau St Jean, Chateau Montelena, Aubert, Au Bon Climat, Hanzell, Kistler, Shafer, Marcassin, Chateau Ste Michelle, Kendall-Jackson, Newton, Beringer; New Zealand – Kumeu River, Babich, Cloudy Bay, Dry River, Vavasour, Villa Maria; Chile – Montes, Tabali, Viña Casablanca; Argentina – Lucca

Characteristics: Acidity (tartness) like a Granny Smith green apple, and an “apple” aroma and taste (yellow or green) are hallmarks of unoaked Chardonnay wine, but they lessen if oak is used in aging the wine. Malolactic fermentation is different than oak influence, although the malolactic bacteria and yeasts that convert tart malic acid to soft lactic acid, often come from oak barrels that have previously been used for aging (old oak). Thus Chardonnay wines can be chameleons of aroma and taste ranging from apple and lemon to tropical and buttery and toasty. It is important with Chardonnay wines to identify the style of the wine that the winemaker and terroir produced before recommending, pairing, or liking it.

Style #1 – Chablis styleBody – light

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry, minerally

Tannins – low

Style #2 – unoaked, warm climateBody – light to medium (-)

Acidity – medium (+)

Sweetness – dry, fruity

Tannins – low

Style #3 – lightly oaked cool climate
(white Burgundy style)Body – medium (-)Acidity – mediumSweetness – dryTannins – low
Style #4- lightly oaked warm climateBody – medium

Acidity – medium (-)

Sweetness – dry, fruity

Tannins – medium (-) to medium

Style #5 – moderately oaked, warm climateBody – medium(+) to full

Acidity – low

Sweetness – dry, but creamy

Tannins – medium (-) to medium

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Unoaked – Pairs with medium bodied acidic foods.
Oaked – Pairs well with medium-bodied dishes that are buttery, fatty, savory or roasted or smoky

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Unoaked – Pairs with fish, shellfish, chicken, pork and veal with citric and other acidic sauces; salads, sushi
Oaked – Pairs with heavier fish, shellfish, chicken, pork and veal with buttery, creamy or other savory sauces; pastas with buttery, pesto or cheese sauces, truffles, smoked salmon

Cheese Pairings:
Unoaked – Boursin herbed (cool climate), Brick, Derby, Feta (sheep’s milk), goat cheese, Gouda, Havarti, Majorero (Spanish hard goat cheese) Mahon, Bucheron (French goat cheese), dry Jack cheese, Cream (warm weather), Neufchatel , Saint -Felicien (French cow;s milk cheese), Raclette, Pave Affinois
Oaked – Mild cheddar, Chaumes, Double Glouchester (similar to mild cheddar),Gouda, Smoked Gouda, Manchego, Monterey Jack, Triple Creme, St André, St Nectaire Zamarano (Spanish sheep’s milk cheese), Brie and Camembert (with or without rinds)

Appetizer Pairings: See Appetizers that Pair with Chardonnay

White Rioja

(ree-YOH-ha), white, same as Macabeo or Viura and sometimes Verdejo
(mack-ah-BAY-oh), (vi-YOUR-ah), (var-DAY-hoe)
Synonyms: Maccebéo, Macabeu, Maccabeu, Viura

Wine Name: Macabeo, Viura, Verdejo, White Rioja

Background: Usually a blend, white Rioja is often composed of low acid grapes Macebeo and Verdejo. These are widely grown in the Rioja region of Spain as well as the Cava producing areas south of Barcelona. They are not very aromatic, and are relatively neutral grapes often used for blending but also used on its own in many Spanish white wines. The wine is low acid and goes with many savory dishes.

Classic Brands and Sources: Artadi, Bodegas Bretón, Martínez Bujanda, Enomar, Marqués de Caceres, Marqués de Murrieta, La Rioja Alta

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical Spanish style
varietal or blended

Body – light

Acidity – low to medium (-)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – low

 

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
pairs well with less acidic, more savory dishes with herbs

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
fish/shellfish baked or poached with a savory sauce, or fried, frittatas, seafood pasta, polenta, pesto, white pizzas, risotto, savory soups, vegetable dishes

Cheese Pairings:
American, Colby, Mild cheddar, Velveeta, Double Glouchester (similar to mild cheddar), Fontina, Gouda, Manchego, Monterey Jack, Mozzarella, Provolone, Triple Creme, St André, Zamarano (Spanish sheep’s milk cheese), Brie and Camembert (without rinds)

See also Appetizers for White Rioja wine

Vinho Verde

(VEEN-oh VEARD-day) same as Albariño
(Ahl-ba-REE-n’yo)
Synonyms: Alvarinho (Portuguese), Albarín Blanco, Abelleiro, Albarina, Albelleiro, Alvarinha, Azal Blanco, Cainho Branco, Galego, Galeguinho, Paderna

Wine Name: Vinho Verde,

Background: In Portugal, Alvarinho, the same white grape as Albariño, but with a different name, produces a very light, low alcohol, unripe and acidic wine called Vinho Verde (literally “green wine”). It does not have the aromatics of the Rias Baixas Albariño but it is often made with a little “frizzante”, small bubbles that give a refreshing tingle to the palate. Occasionally some red grapes are thrown in to make it a rosé or pale red color. It can be a delightful summertime wine.

Classic Brands and Sources: Portugal (Vinho Verde): Casal Garcia, Gazela, Quinta da Aveleda, Quinta de Soalheiro, Luis Seabra

Characteristics:

Style #1 – Vinho Verde

Body – light to medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry with frizzante

Tannins – low

 

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
pairs well with moderately acidic, light bodied dishes, saffron

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
seafood (especially grilled and slightly spicy), Cajun flavored dishes (e.g., jambalya, creole sauces), cerviche, chorizo, paella, sushi, lemon chicken, pizza, tomato-based acidic pasta, salads, vegetable dishes

Cheese Pairings:
Feta (sheep’s milk), Garrotxa, goat cheese, Gouda, Majorero (Spanish hard goat cheese) Mahon, Murcia, Bucheron (French goat cheese), Roncal, Tetilla, dry Jack cheese, cream cheese, Neufchatel

See also Appetizers that pair with Albariño

Vidal Blanc

 (vee-DOLL-blahn)
Synonyms: None

Wine Name: Vidal Blanc, Vidal

Background: Vidal Blanc is a cold hardy white wine grape was developed by Jean Louis Vidal in the 1930’s. It is a cross between the French Ugni Blanc grape and a native American interspecies hybrid grape.

Vidal Blanc wine is quite acidic and fruity with citrus, pineapple and floral flavors. Cool weather Vidal is sometimes vinified to have a Riesling-like character. It can be made dry, off dry, semi-sweet or sweet. It is a popular, high producing vine grown mostly in Canada, the northeast U.S. and other east coast states.

Classic Brands and Sources: Arrowhead Spring, Jackson-Triggs, Inniskillin, Konzelmann, Peller Estates, Pillitteri Estates, Standing Stone, Swedish Hill

Characteristics:

Style #1 – dry

Body – medium (-)

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry but fruity

Tannins – low

Style #2 – off dry

Body – medium

Acidity – perceived medium

Sweetness – slightly sweet

Tannins – low

Style #3 – sweet dessert, Ice Wine

Body – full

Acidity – perceived low

Sweetness – sweet

Tannins – low


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Dry Vidal pairs with acidic dishes while off-dry Vidal pairs better with savory, sweet and sour dishes, and lightly to moderately spiced (hot) dishes; Late Harvest and Ice wine styles are primarily dessert wines that do well on their own or with sweet desserts.

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
dry – light seafood poached, sautéed or grilled with acidic sauces, poached salmon, chicken, salads with vinaigrette, smoked and cured meats. Asian food not heavily spiced
off dry – pork, chicken or duck with fruity sauce, ham, fruit salads, fruits, cold cuts, spicy cuisines such as Cajun, Creole, Thai, Chinese, Vietnamese, Mexican, Curries with coconut, Indian , Tex-Mex, foie gras
sweet – desserts, caramel, pâté, blue cheese and other salty cheeses, fruits with added sugar, bread pudding

Cheese Pairings:
dry – Brie with rind, Brin D’Amour, Camembert with rind, Emmental, Feta, Garroxta, most goat cheeses, Muenster, Raclette, Reblochon, Saint-Nectaire, Swiss, Vacherin
off dry – Brick, Colby, Double Glouster, Edam, Fontina, Gorgonzola, Gouda, Gruyère, Havarti, Langres, Vermont Shepard
sweet – any rich cheese, blue cheeses, “cheese cake”

Vernaccia

  (ver-NAHTCH-cha)
Synonyms: Vernaccia, Guarnacha, Granaccia, and Granazza

Wine Name: Vernaccia, Vernaccia di San Gimignano

Background: Almost every region in Italy has a Vernaccia grape but they are all different. Vernaccia is derived from the same root as the word “vernacular”; it simply indicates a local grape. The best known Vernaccia is a white wine grape usually associated with San Gimignano in Tuscany Italy. It produces a crisp wine with good acidity, citrus fruit and sometimes butterscotch overtones and tannins on the finish.

Classic Brands and Sources: Le Calcinaie, Casale-Falchini, Vincenzo Cesani, Attilio Contoni, La Lastra, Melini, Montenidioli, Giovanni Panizzi, Il Paradiso, Pietrafitta, La Rampa di Fugnano, Casa alle Vacche, Vagnoni

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typicalBody – light to medium (-)

Acidity – medium

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – slight to low

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
pairs well with more savory, herbal dishes, and vegetables

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
fish fried, grilled or poached, pork, chicken, pasta that is non-tomato based (cream, butter, cheese), prosciutto, risotto, artichokes, asparagus, beans and other vegetables with herbs, salads with oil dominant dressings

Cheese Pairings:
Boursin (herbed or pepper), goat cheese (aged) , Pecorino, Fontina

Appetizer Pairings:  See Appetizers that Pair with Vernaccia

Torrontés

  (tore-RON-tayz)
Synonyms: 3 main varieties:
Torrontés Riojano is also known as Malvasia, Torrontel, and Torrontel Riojano.
Torrontés Sanjuanino is also known as Moscatel Romano, Moscatel Sanjuanino, and Torrontés
Torrontés Mendocino is also known as Chichera, Loca Blanca, Palet, Torrontel, Uva Chichera, Torrontés Mendozino

Wine Name: Torrontés (usually Torrontés Riojano)

Background: Torrontés is an aromatic white grape grown mostly in Argentina that is a cross between Muscat and Criolla. It has the floral and light spice aromas of Muscat and often will mimic a Gewürtztraminer except that it is high acid and not as full-bodied as a Gewürtz. In Argentina it is frequently consumed with a twist of lime on the rocks called a Tincho. Sometimes it is made as a sweet wine.

Classic Brands and Sources: Alamos, Camino del Inca, Bodega Colome, Norton, Tomero, Zuccardi

Characteristics:

Style #1 – dry

Body – medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry but floral

Tannins – low

Style #2 – sweet

Body – medium (+) to full

Acidity – perceived as medium

Sweetness – sweet

Tannins – low


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs with medium-bodied acidic dishes along with spices and hotness

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Fish, shellfish, chidken, veal and pork with acidic sauces and spicy sacues, South American and Pacific rim cuisine

Cheese Pairings:
Boursin herbed, Brick, Derby, Feta (sheep’s milk), goat cheese, Gouda, Havarti, Majorero (Spanish hard goat cheese) Mahon, Bucheron (French goat cheese), dry Jack cheese, pepper Jack, Cream cheese, Neufchatel , Saint -Felicien (French cow;s milk cheese), Raclette, Pave Affinois

Garganega

(gahr-GAH-neh-gah)
Synonyms: Garganega (gahr-GAH-neh-gah) (the predominant grape varietal)

Wine Name: Soave (SWAH-vay), Soave Classico, Garganega

Background:This grape is usually blended with Trebbiano and sometimes a bit of Chardonnay or Pinot Bianco to make Italian Soave, a medium-bodied wine in the Veneto region around Verona, Italy. Garganega must be at least 70 percent of the blend. The best producing regions are labelled DOCG Soave Classico or Soave Classico Superiore. On its own it, Garganega tastes of almonds, plums and citrus fruit and occasionally a little herbal on the finish. Soave can be an excellent food wine for more savory dishes.

A sweet wine, Recioto di Soave is also made by allowing the grapes to dry and raisinate thus producing more concentrated sugars and flavors.

Classic Brands and Sources:Inama, Pieropan, Prà, Tedeschi

Characteristics:

Style #1 – Soave Classico

Body – light

Acidity – low

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – low to medium (-)

Style #2 – Recioto di Soave

Body – medium (-)

Acidity – low

Sweetness – semi-sweet

Tannins – low to medium (-)


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
The classico pairs well with less acidic, more savory dishes with herbs while the Recioto can also go with spicier foods and some desserts

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Fish/shellfish baked or poached with a savory sauce, or fried, seafood pasta, polenta, pesto, white pizzas, risotto, savory soups, vegetable dishes

Cheese Pairings:
American, Colby, Mild cheddar, Velveeta, Double Glouchester (similar to mild cheddar), Fontina, Gouda, Manchego, Monterey Jack, Mozzarella, Provolone, Triple Creme, St André, Zamarano (Spanish sheep’s milk cheese), Brie and Camembert (without rinds)

See also Appetizers that go with medium acidity-medium bodied white wines

Sauvignon Blanc

(SOH-vihn-yohn BLAHN)
Synonyms: Sauvignon Vert/Tocai Friuliano/Sauvignonasse, Sauvignon Gris

Wine Name: Sauvignon Blanc, Fumé Blanc (California), Pouilly Fumé and Sancerre (Loire Valley), some Bordeaux Blanc, Pavillon Blanc (Bordeaux), Saint-Bris (Burgundy near Chablis), Friuliano (Italy), Sauvignonasse (Slovenia)

Background: Sauvignon Blanc is a French grape varietal spread around the world with some variants. In cool climates, the Sauvignon Blanc grape generally takes on classic green, herbaceous flavors such as grass, green pepper, gooseberries, passion fruit or elderflower. It has a dry, crisp, pungent taste and medium body. The French Loire Valley regions of Sancerre and Pouilly (more herbaceous and lemon grass flavor) as well as the South Island of New Zealand (more grapefruit in flavor) yield examples of this type. In northern Italy, Sauvignon Vert, known as Friulano or Tocai Friulano (now not authorized as a name), is slightly less aromatic but still has a grassy, green edge to it.

In temperate or warm climates (California, Australia, Chile, South Africa ) the Sauvignon Blanc grape takes on more tropical flavors such as melon, kiwi, fig, lime and grapefruit aromas. Its wines still taste dry and acidic. Oak is occasionally used with Sauvignon Blanc (some Fume Blanc, white Bordeaux) but it makes the wine fuller bodied, with pears, herbs and citrus and a more balanced acidity.

Classic Brands and Sources: Marlborough New Zealand – Oyster Bay, Cloudy Bay, Kim Crawford, Brancott; France – Henri Bourgeois, Jean-Claude Chatelain, Pascal Jolivet, Chateaux Smith-Haut- Lafite; California – Araujo, Kunde, Mason, Murphy-Goode, St Supery, Wente; Chile – Montes, Santa Rita, Concha y Toro; South Africa- Mulderbosch

Characteristics:

Style #1 – Cool ClimateBody – light to medium

Acidity – high and tangy

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – low

Style #2 – Warm ClimateBody – light to medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – slight fruity

Tannins – low

Style #3 – Sauvignion Vert/FriulanoBody – light to medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – slight fruity

Tannins – low

Style #4 – Fumé BlancBody – light to medium

Acidity – medium to high

Sweetness – slight fruity and hint oak

Tannins – low

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Cool weather pairs with herbal, and fairly acidic dishes and sushi, warm climate and Friuliano pairs with more medium acidic and medium-bodied dishes, Fume Blanc can also do well with lightly smoked dishes

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Baked or sautéed fish/shellfish, grilled seafood (Fume Blanc), sushi (cool climate), baked/roasted chicken, turkey or pork, grilled white meats (Fume Blanc), light curry dishes, Mexican dishes, salsa, Tex-Mex or Thai dishes, salads, vegetable dishes

Cheese Pairings:
Boursin herbed (cool climate), Brick, Derby, Feta (sheep’s milk), goat cheese, Gouda, Havarti, Majorero (Spanish hard goat cheese) Mahon, Bucheron (French goat cheese), dry Jack cheese, Cream (warm weather), Neufchatel , Saint -Felicien (French cow;s milk cheese), Raclette, Pave Affinois

Sauvignon Vert

(SOH-vihn-yohn VEART) very close relative of Sauvignion Blanc (SOH-vihn-yohn BLAHN)
Synonyms: Sauvignon Vert/Tocai Friuliano/Sauvignonasse, Sauvignon Gris

Wine Name: Sauvignon Blanc, Fumé Blanc (California), Pouilly Fumé and Sancerre (Loire Valley), some Bordeaux Blanc, Pavillon Blanc (Bordeaux), Saint-Bris (Burgundy near Chablis), Friuliano (Italy), Sauvignonasse (Slovenia)

Background: Sauvignon Blanc is a French grape varietal spread around the world with some variants. In cool climates, the Sauvignon Blanc grape generally takes on classic green, herbaceous flavors such as grass, green pepper, gooseberries, passion fruit or elderflower. It has a dry, crisp, pungent taste and medium body. The French Loire Valley regions of Sancerre and Pouilly (more herbaceous and lemon grass flavor) as well as the South Island of New Zealand (more grapefruit in flavor) yield examples of this type. In northern Italy, Sauvignon Vert, known as Friulano or Tocai Friulano (now not authorized as a name), is slightly less aromatic but still has a grassy, green edge to it.

In temperate or warm climates (California, Australia, Chile, South Africa ) the Sauvignon Blanc grape takes on more tropical flavors such as melon, kiwi, fig, lime and grapefruit aromas. Its wines still taste dry and acidic. Oak is occasionally used with Sauvignon Blanc (some Fume Blanc, white Bordeaux) but it makes the wine fuller bodied, with pears, herbs and citrus and a more balanced acidity.

Classic Brands and Sources:Marlborough New Zealand – Oyster Bay, Cloudy Bay, Kim Crawford, Brancott; France – Henri Bourgeois, Jean-Claude Chatelain, Pascal Jolivet, Chateaux Smith-Haut- Lafite; California – Araujo, Kunde, Mason, Murphy-Goode, St Supery, Wente; Chile – Montes, Santa Rita, Concha y Toro; South Africa- Mulderbosch

Characteristics:

Style #1 – Cool Climate

Body – light to medium

Acidity – high and tangy

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – low

Style #2 – Warm Climate

Body – light to medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – slight fruity

Tannins – low

Style #3 – Sauvignion Vert/Friulano

Body – light to medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – slight fruity

Tannins – low

Style #4 – Fumé Blanc

Body – light to medium

Acidity – medium to high

Sweetness – slight fruity and hint oak

Tannins – low


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Cool weather pairs with herbal, and fairly acidic dishes and sushi, warm climate and Friuliano pairs with more medium acidic and medium-bodied dishes, Fume Blanc can also do well with lightly smoked dishes

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Baked or sautéed fish/shellfish, grilled seafood (Fume Blanc), sushi (cool climate), baked/roasted chicken, turkey or pork, grilled white meats (Fume Blanc), light curry dishes, Mexican dishes, salsa, Tex-Mex or Thai dishes, salads, vegetable dishes

Cheese Pairings:
Boursin herbed (cool climate), Brick, Derby, Feta (sheep’s milk), goat cheese, Gouda, Havarti, Majorero (Spanish hard goat cheese) Mahon, Bucheron (French goat cheese), dry Jack cheese, Cream (warm weather), Neufchatel , Saint -Felicien (French cow;s milk cheese), Raclette, Pave Affinois