1 3 4 5 6 7 12

Côtes du Rhône (red)

  (Coat-due-ROAN)
Synonyms: In the northern Rhône, Syrah is the predominant grape in red wines. Côtes du Rhône from the southern Rhone Valley is a blended wine with Grenache as the predominant grape but often with Syrah and Mourvèdre grapes.

Wine Name: Côtes du Rhône is produced in both the northern and southern Rhône Valley. However it may take on the name of specific cru villages without being called Côtes du Rhône. This would apply to specific southern Rhône villages such as Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Gigondas, Lirac, Rasteau, Vacqueyras, and Vinsobres; in northern Rhône, wines take the names of the specific cru villages of Cornas, Côte-Rôtie, Crozes-Hermitage, Hermitage, Saint Joseph, Saint Péray,

Background: In the southern Rhône the Grenache grape is required to be present at not less than 50%, with 20% Syrah and/or Mourvèdre. A maximum of 20% of other authorized varieties is permitted. This blend varies in taste from straight Grenache in that it is more tannic (from the Mourvèdre ) and fuller-bodied with more flowery aroma elements (from the Syrah).

In the northern Rhône, red wines are 100 % from the Syrah grape and tend to be full bodied and very tannic.

Classic Brands and Sources: Beaucastel, Chapoutier, Jaboulet, Delas Frères, Guigal, Ferraton, Chave, Vins de Vienne, Andre Romero’s La Soumade, Boudinaud

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical northern Rhône

Body – full

Acidity – medium (+)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

Style #2 – typical southern Rhône

Body – medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium (+)


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs with acidic foods/sauces, salty and fatty foods

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Beef, cold cuts, barbeque, chicken, chili, pizza, game, sausage, truffles, grilled tuna

Cheese Pairings:
Blue cheese, Swiss, Saint-Nectaire, Saint-Marcellin, Roncal, Port Salut, Pont-L’Eveque, Maroilles, Gouda, Emmental, Castelmagno, Beaufort, Banon

Carménère

  (kahr-mhen-NEH-re)
Synonyms: Carménère, Grand Vidure, Bordo, Bouton blanc, Caberne Karmener, Cabernella, Cabernelle, Cabernet Carménère, Cabernet Cosmo, Cabernet Gernicht, Cabernella, Cabernet Grande, Cabernet Grosso, Cabernet Italico, Carbonet, Carbouet, Carmenea, Caremenelle, Carmenegre, Carmeneyre, Grand Carmenet, Grande Vidure, Gros Vidure, Kaberne, Kaberne Karmener, Kabernel, Karmene, Karmensel, Uva Francesca

Wine Name: Carménère

Background: Originally from France, this Merlot-like grape was mostly used in blending wines for Bordeaux-type blends. Chile is now the main producer of this grape and produces it as a pure varietal as well as using it in red wine blends. When grown in warm climates where it can fully ripen, it tastes of blackberry, plum, tobacco, a hint of spices and has soft tannins. Cool climate or unripe Carménère may exhibit green pepper and vegetal tastes and aromas.

Classic Brands and Sources: Bisquertt, Calterra, Casa Lapastole, Concha y Toro, Casa Silva, Montes, Santa Rita, Veramonte, Vinos Ventisquero

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical Chilean

Body – full

Acidity – low

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs well with savory, low acid dishes and also with some spice.

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Beef, lamb, chicken, turkey, veal or pork grilled, roasted or braised, chili, hamburgers, meatloaf, mushrooms, cheese based pasta, risotto.

Cheese Pairings:
Brie and Camembert without rind, mild Cheddar, Emmental, Gouda, smoked Gouda, Gorganzola, Manchego, Monterey Jack, Pepper Jack, Pecorino, Provolone, Romano

Appetizer Pairings:

See Appetizers that Pair with Carménère

Cabernet Sauvignon

  (KA-behr-nay saw-vin-YAWN)
Synonyms: Cabernet Sauvignon, Petite Vidure, Bidure

Wine Name: Cabernet Sauvignon, Bordeaux (from the left bank, Cabernet dominant)

Background: Cabernet Sauvignon is a popular grape grown in almost every country of the world and makes full-bodied red wines. It is produced as a varietal grape (at least 75-85% of a wine) and in blended wines such as Bordeaux or Meritage wines. In cool climates a Cabernet dominant wine may taste of black currants, cedar wood, green pepper aromas and be high in acid and moderately tannic. A Bordeaux wine from the French region of Medoc would be typical of this cooler climate style. When the Cabernet Sauvignon grape is grown in a temperate or warm climate it will tend to have deeper fruit flavors of black currants, black cherry, black olive and occasionally mint, eucalyptus or menthol aroma and be somewhat less acidic. A full-bodied California Cabernet Sauvignon would typify this style but Cabernet is being grown in many countries.

Classic Brands and Sources: USA – Many northern California and Washington State producers; France – many left bank Bordeaux producers; South America – many Chile and Argentina producers. Australia – producers from Coonawara or Margaret River.

Characteristics:

Style #1 – cool climate

Body – medium (+)

Acidity – medium (+)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium (+)

Style #2 – warm climate

Body – full

Acidity – medium

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs well with red, savory meats, grilled or roasted

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Beef, lamb, game, chicken, turkey, veal or pork grilled, roasted or braised, chili, hamburgers, meatloaf, mushrooms, cheese based pasta, risotto.

Cheese Pairings:
Blue cheeses, mild and medium sharp Cheddar, Edam, Glouchester, Muenster, Provolone (aged), Parmesan, Pecorino, Roncal, Smoked Gouda

Meritage

 (MER-i-tidge [rhymes with heritage])
Meritage is the name for U.S. blends that include the traditional grapes used for left Bank Bordeaux wines that are Cabernet Sauvignon dominant.

Synonyms: Refers to blends that are predominantly Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, and Petit Verdot in various proportions. If from the Bordeaux region of France it is called Bordeaux. If from the New World names are Meritage or Bordeaux-like blend.

Wine Name: Bordeaux, Meritage, Bordeaux-like Blend

Background: Wines made outside of the Bordeaux region of France are not allowed to use the name Bordeaux. Red Meritage, as defined in the USA must consist of two or more of the following varieties: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, Petit Verdot, St. Macaire, Gros Verdot and Carmenere. No single variety may make up more than 90 percent of the blend. This blend emulates the blend used on the left bank of the Garonne River in the Medoc, Haut Medoc and Grave areas of Bordeaux. It is different from the right bank and Entre du Mers regions which use mostly Merlot and/or Cabernet Franc in their blends.

The taste is classically that of black currants with tobacco, cedar and leather undertones from the French oak barrels used for aging.

Classic Brands and Sources: Many Bordeaux France producers; USA – Lyeth, Estancia, Dominus, Opus One, Trefethen, Joseph Phelps, Chateau Ste Michelle, St Supery

Characteristics:

 

Style #1 – typical left bank BordeauxBody – medium (+)

Acidity – medium (+)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

Style #2 – typical right bank BordeauxBody – medium

Acidity – medium (-)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium (+)

Style #3 – typical U.S. MeritageBody – full

Acidity – medium (-)

Sweetness – dry but fruity if less than 5 yrs old

Tannins – medium (+)

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs well with red, savory meats, grilled or roasted.

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Beef, lamb, game, chicken, turkey, veal or pork grilled, roasted or braised, chili, hamburgers, meatloaf, mushrooms, cheese based pasta, risotto.

Cheese Pairings:
Mild and medium sharp Cheddar, Corvo, Edam, Glouchester, Muenster, Provolone (aged), Parmesan, Pecorino, Roncal, Smoked Gouda.

Appetizer Pairings:  See Appetizers that Pair with Cabernet Sauvignon

 

Bordeaux

  (bore-DOE) / (MER-i-tidge [rhymes with heritage])
Synonyms: Refers to blends that are predominantly Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, and Petit Verdot in various proportions. If from the Bordeaux region of France it is called Bordeaux. If from the New World names are Meritage or Bordeaux-like blend.

Wine Name: Bordeaux, Meritage, Bordeaux-like Blend

Background: Wines made outside of the Bordeaux region of France are not allowed to use the name Bordeaux. Red Meritage, as defined in the USA must consist of two or more of the following varieties: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, Petit Verdot, St. Macaire, Gros Verdot and Carmenere. No single variety may make up more than 90 percent of the blend. This blend emulates the blend used on the left bank of the Garonne River in the Medoc, Haut Medoc and Grave areas of Bordeaux. It is different from the right bank and Entre du Mers regions which use mostly Merlot and/or Cabernet Franc in their blends.

The taste is classically that of black currants with tobacco, cedar and leather undertones from the French oak barrels used for aging.

Classic Brands and Sources: Many Bordeaux France producers; USA – Lyeth, Estancia, Dominus, Opus One, Trefethen, Joseph Phelps, Chateau Ste Michelle, St Supery

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical left bank BordeauxBody – medium (+)

Acidity – medium (+)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

Style #2 – typical right bank BordeauxBody – medium

Acidity – medium (-)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium (+)

Style #3 – typical U.S. MeritageBody – full

Acidity – medium (-)

Sweetness – dry but fruity if less than 5 yrs old

Tannins – medium (+)

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs well with red, savory meats, grilled or roasted.

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Beef, lamb, game, chicken, turkey, veal or pork grilled, roasted or braised, chili, hamburgers, meatloaf, mushrooms, cheese based pasta, risotto.

Cheese Pairings:
Mild and medium sharp Cheddar, Corvo, Edam, Glouchester, Muenster, Provolone (aged), Parmesan, Pecorino, Roncal, Smoked Gouda.

See also Appetizer Pairings for Right Bank Bordeaux

See also Appetizer Pairings for Left Bank Bordeaux

Barbaresco

  (BAR-bear-RESS-ko)
Barbaresco is 100% nebbiolo (neh-b’YOH-loh) grape from the Piedmonte region of northern Italy.

Synonyms: Nebbiolo, Spanna, Picoutener, Chiavennasca

Wine Name: Barolo (bah-ROE-low), Barbaresco (BAR-bear-RESS-ko), Nebbiolo, Nebbiolo di Alba, Gattinara, Lange Nebbiolo, Valtellina

Background: Nebbiolo is grown predominantly in northern Italy where it produces full-bodied dry, tannic red wines with a long finish called Barolo and Barbaresco. The wines show subtle fruit, mostly blackberry, cherry, truffle, spice, rose and tar character. Old style Barolo wines were strongly tannic and could not be drunk much before 10 years of age. With modern techniques using smaller French barrels for aging they are now drinkable at 5-6 years.

Classic Brands and Sources: Altare, Ceretto, Domenico Clerico, Aldo Conterno, Giacomo Conterno, Luigi Einudi, Bruno Giacoso, Gaja, Paolo Scavino, Vietti, Roberto Voerzio; USA – Viansa, Renwood, Il Podere dell’Olivos, Au Bon Climat, Cavatappi; Australia – Brown Brothers, Dromana, Happs, Maglieri, Pizzini

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical Nebbiolo (Italian)

Body – medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium (+)

Style #2 – Barbaresco

Body – medium (+)

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium (+)

Style #3 – Barolo

Body – full

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

Wine and Food Pairing Guidelines:
Pairs with foods that are acidic and fatty.

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Red meats, game, roasted pork, pork belly, chicken, and duck with acidic or wine sauces, mushrooms, truffles, risotto.

Cheese Pairings:
Asiago (aged), blue cheese/gorgonzola, Castelmagno, Fontina, Gouda, Parmesan, Pecorino, sharp Cheddar

Barolo

  (bah-ROE-low)
Barolo is 100% nebbiolo (neh-b’YOH-loh) grape from the Barolo region in the Piedmonte of northern Italy.

Synonyms: Nebbiolo, Spanna, Picoutener, Chiavennasca

Wine Name: Barolo (bah-ROE-low), Barbaresco (BAR-bear-RESS-ko), Nebbiolo, Nebbiolo di Alba, Gattinara, Lange Nebbiolo, Valtellina

Background: Nebbiolo is grown predominantly in northern Italy where it produces full-bodied dry, tannic red wines with a long finish called Barolo and Barbaresco. The wines show subtle fruit, mostly blackberry, cherry, truffle, spice, rose and tar character. Old style Barolo wines were strongly tannic and could not be drunk much before 10 years of age. With modern techniques using smaller French barrels for aging they are now drinkable at 5-6 years.

Classic Brands and Sources: Altare, Ceretto, Domenico Clerico, Aldo Conterno, Giacomo Conterno, Luigi Einudi, Bruno Giacoso, Gaja, Paolo Scavino, Vietti, Roberto Voerzio; USA – Viansa, Renwood, Il Podere dell’Olivos, Au Bon Climat, Cavatappi; Australia – Brown Brothers, Dromana, Happs, Maglieri, Pizzini

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical Nebbiolo (Italian)

Body – medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium (+)

Style #2 – Barbaresco

Body – medium (+)

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium (+)

Style #3 – Barolo

Body – full

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high


Wine and Food Pairing Guidelines:
Pairs with foods that are acidic and fatty.

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Red meats, game, roasted pork, pork belly, chicken, and duck with acidic or wine sauces, mushrooms, truffles, risotto.

Cheese Pairings:
Asiago (aged), blue cheese/gorgonzola, Castelmagno, Fontina, Gouda, Parmesan, Pecorino, sharp Cheddar

Nebbiolo

  (neh-b’YOH-loh)
Synonyms: Nebbiolo, Spanna, Picoutener, Chiavennasca

Wine Name: Barolo (bah-ROE-low), Barbaresco (BAR-bear-RESS-ko), Nebbiolo, Nebbiolo di Alba, Gattinara, Lange Nebbiolo, Valtellina

Background: Nebbiolo is grown predominantly in northern Italy where it produces full-bodied dry, tannic red wines with a long finish called Barolo and Barbaresco. The wines show subtle fruit, mostly blackberry, cherry, truffle, spice, rose and tar character. Old style Barolo wines were strongly tannic and could not be drunk much before 10 years of age. With modern techniques using smaller French barrels for aging they are now drinkable at 5-6 years.

Classic Brands and Sources: Altare, Ceretto, Domenico Clerico, Aldo Conterno, Giacomo Conterno, Luigi Einudi, Bruno Giacoso, Gaja, Paolo Scavino, Vietti, Roberto Voerzio; USA – Viansa, Renwood, Il Podere dell’Olivos, Au Bon Climat, Cavatappi; Australia – Brown Brothers, Dromana, Happs, Maglieri, Pizzini

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical Nebbiolo (Italian)

Body – medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium (+)

Style #2 – Barbaresco

Body – medium (+)

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium (+)

Style #3 – Barolo

Body – full

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high


Wine and Food Pairing Guidelines:
Pairs with foods that are acidic and fatty.

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Red meats, game, roasted pork, pork belly, chicken, and duck with acidic or wine sauces, mushrooms, truffles, risotto.

Cheese Pairings:
Asiago (aged), blue cheese/gorgonzola, Castelmagno, Fontina, Gouda, Parmesan, Pecorino, sharp Cheddar

Red Rioja

  (re-OH-ha)
Red Rioja’s typical blend will consist of approximately 60% Tempranillo and up to 20% Garnacha, with much smaller proportions of Mazuelo and Graciano. However it can be up to 100% Tempranillo.

Synonyms: Tempranillo, Tinto Fino, Cencibel, Tinto del Pais, Tinto de Toro, Ull de Liebre (Spain); Tinta Roriz, Tinta Aragonez (Portugal); Tempranilla (Argentina ), Aldepenas, Aragones, Aragónez de Ferra, Aragónez de Elvas, Arganda, Arinto Tinto, Cencibel, Cencibera, Chinchillana, Chinchillano, Chinchilyano, Cupani, Escobera, Garnacho Fono, Grenache de Logrono, Jacibiera, Jacivera, Juan Garcia, Negra de Mesa, Ojo de Liebre, Olho de Lebre, Sensibel, Tempranilla, Tempranillo de la Rioja, Tempranillo de Perralta, Tempranillo de Rioja, Tempranillo de Rioza, Tinta Aragóneza, Tinta Aragónes, Tinta de Santiago, Tinta de Toro, Tinta del País, Tinta do Inacio, Tinta Monteiro, Tinta Roríz da Penajola, Tinta Santiago, Tinto Aragon, Tinto de la Rioja, Tinto de Madrid, Tinto de Rioja, Tinto Fino Ull de Llebre, Tinto Madrid, Tinto País, Tinto Ribiera, Tinto Riojano, Ull de Llebre, Valdepeñas, Valdepenhas, Verdiell, Vid de Aranda

Wine Name: Tempranillo, Rioja (red) and many different producer brand names from Rioja, Ribero del Duero, Toro, Castilla-La Mancha, Valdepeñas, and Navarra in Spain and Douro in Portugal

Background: Tempranillo is to Spain what Merlot is to California. It is a low acid grape but the exception is that it has higher tannins than Merlot. Tempranillo grapes are used to produce the great red Spanish Rioja and Ribera del Duero wines and dry red wines of the Douro in Portugal. Sometimes the wines are pure Tempranillo and sometimes they are blended with other grapes. The grapes can make wines of different styles from light and fruity to full-bodied, fine wines with great tannins. Tempranillo usually tastes of spicy plum, blackberry, raspberry, and black cherry when young, and coffee, tobacco and mineral as they age. In cooler climates, Tempranillo usually makes a low acid wine (the opposite of what most grapes do) that takes well to oak aging. Most often, American oak is used for the aging. Acidity can range from low to high and tannins can range from soft to harsh, depending upon the grape grower and the vintner.

A step above typical Rioja is Crianza (aged 2 years, one in oak barrel and one in bottle). Next comes Reserva (aged 3 years, one in oak barrel and two in bottle, and the oldest being a Gran Reserva (aged 5 years, two in oak barrels and three in the bottle)

Classic Brands and Sources: Abadia Retuerta, Artadi, Allende, Bodegas Roda, Muga, Palacio, Montecastro, Alejandro Fernandez, Emilio Moro and many other Spanish producers in Toro, Rioja, Ribera del Duero ; Portugal – Cortes de Cima, Quinta dos Caravalhais, Quinta do Vale da Raposa

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical

Body – medium (-)

Acidity – medium (-)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium

Style #2 – Rioja Reserva +

Body – medium (+)

Acidity – low

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Tempranillo wines generally pair better with more savory, herbed dishes rather than acidic dishes

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Game, duck, lamb, sausages both savory and spiced, smoked ham, grilled and roasted meats especially with herbs, paella, cheese based pasta, root vegetables and beans

Cheese Pairings:
American, Colby, Mild cheddar, Velveeta, Double Glouchester (similar to mild cheddar), Fontina, Gouda, Mahon, Manchego, Monterey Jack, Roncal, Serena, Triple Creme, St André, Zamarano (Spanish sheep’s milk cheese), Brie and Camembert (without rinds)

Appetizer Pairings:

See Appetizer Pairings for Tempranillo

Tempranillo

  (te-prah-NEE-yoh)
Synonyms: Tempranillo, Tinto Fino, Cencibel, Tinto del Pais, Tinto de Toro, Ull de Liebre (Spain); Tinta Roriz, Tinta Aragonez (Portugal); Tempranilla (Argentina ), Aldepenas, Aragones, Aragónez de Ferra, Aragónez de Elvas, Arganda, Arinto Tinto, Cencibel, Cencibera, Chinchillana, Chinchillano, Chinchilyano, Cupani, Escobera, Garnacho Fono, Grenache de Logrono, Jacibiera, Jacivera, Juan Garcia, Negra de Mesa, Ojo de Liebre, Olho de Lebre, Sensibel, Tempranilla, Tempranillo de la Rioja, Tempranillo de Perralta, Tempranillo de Rioja, Tempranillo de Rioza, Tinta Aragóneza, Tinta Aragónes, Tinta de Santiago, Tinta de Toro, Tinta del País, Tinta do Inacio, Tinta Monteiro, Tinta Roríz da Penajola, Tinta Santiago, Tinto Aragon, Tinto de la Rioja, Tinto de Madrid, Tinto de Rioja, Tinto Fino Ull de Llebre, Tinto Madrid, Tinto País, Tinto Ribiera, Tinto Riojano, Ull de Llebre, Valdepeñas, Valdepenhas, Verdiell, Vid de Aranda

Wine Name: Tempranillo, Rioja and many different producer brand names from Rioja, Ribero del Duero, Toro, Castilla-La Mancha, Valdepeñas, and Navarra in Spain and Douro in Portugal

Background: Tempranillo is to Spain what Merlot is to California. It is a low acid grape but the exception is that it has higher tannins than Merlot. Tempranillo grapes are used to produce the great red Spanish Rioja and Ribera del Duero wines and dry red wines of the Douro in Portugal. Sometimes the wines are pure Tempranillo and sometimes they are blended with other grapes. The grapes can make wines of different styles from light and fruity to full-bodied, fine wines with great tannins. Tempranillo usually tastes of spicy plum, blackberry, raspberry, and black cherry when young, and coffee, tobacco and mineral as they age. In cooler climates, Tempranillo usually makes a low acid wine (the opposite of what most grapes do) that takes well to oak aging. Most often, American oak is used for the aging. Acidity can range from low to high and tannins can range from soft to harsh, depending upon the grape grower and the vintner.

A step above typical Rioja is Crianza (aged 2 years, one in oak barrel and one in bottle). Next comes Reserva (aged 3 years, one in oak barrel and two in bottle, and the oldest being a Gran Reserva (aged 5 years, two in oak barrels and three in the bottle)

Classic Brands and Sources: Abadia Retuerta, Artadi, Allende, Bodegas Roda, Muga, Palacio, Montecastro, Alejandro Fernandez, Emilio Moro and many other Spanish producers in Toro, Rioja, Ribera del Duero ; Portugal – Cortes de Cima, Quinta dos Caravalhais, Quinta do Vale da Raposa

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical

Body – medium (-)

Acidity – medium (-)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium

Style #2 – Rioja Reserva +

Body – medium (+)

Acidity – low

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Tempranillo wines generally pair better with more savory, herbed dishes rather than acidic dishes

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Game, duck, lamb, sausages both savory and spiced, smoked ham, grilled and roasted meats especially with herbs, paella, cheese based pasta, root vegetables and beans

Cheese Pairings:
American, Colby, Mild cheddar, Velveeta, Double Glouchester (similar to mild cheddar), Fontina, Gouda, Mahon, Manchego, Monterey Jack, Roncal, Serena, Triple Creme, St André, Zamarano (Spanish sheep’s milk cheese), Brie and Camembert (without rinds)

Appetizer Pairings:

See Appetizer Pairings for Tempranillo

1 3 4 5 6 7 12