1 4 5 6 7 8 12

Zweigelt

  (zz-VIE-gelt)
Synonyms: Rotburger, Blaue Zweigeltrebe, Blauer Zweigelt, Zweigelt Blau, Zweigeltrebe, , Zweigelt-rebe, Zweigeltrebe blau, Cvaigelt, Cveigelt, Klosterneuburg 71, Klosterneuburg 181-2-71, Totburger, Zweigelt 71, 

Wine Name: Zweigelt

Background: Zweigelt was developed in Austria in 1922 by Dr. Friedrich Zweigelt from a crossing of St. Laurent and Blaufränkisch grapes. It is presently the most widely-grown red grape variety in Austria. The grape produces a wine with cherry flavors, exotic spice. pepper and floral character and aromas of cinnamon and violets.

Classic Brands and Sources: Feiler-Artinger, Gernot Heinrich, Hopler, Hans Pitnauer, Weingut Hans Johann Schwarz, Weingut Umathum, Weinlaubenhof Alois Kracher

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical

Body – medium (-)

Acidity – medium

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs with white meats and light red meats with acidic sauces

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Pairs with lighter red meats, fowl, chicken and shellfish especially when cooked in wine or with a wine, vinegar or tomato-based sauce. Roasted ham hock, grilled sausages with mustard, duck confit. Predominantly sweet or fruity dishes should be avoided.

Cheese Pairings:
Epiosses, Feta (sheep’s milk), goat cheese, Gouda, Majorero (Spanish hard goat cheese) Mahon, Bucheron (French goat cheese), dry Jack cheese, cream cheese, Gouda, Neufchatel, Pont-L’Eveque, Raclette, Reblochon, Roquefort, Saint-Nectare, Vacherin

Appetizer Pairings:

See also Light red acidic wine appetizers

Valdiguié

  (VAL-dih-ghee)
Synonyms: Valdiguié, Aramon du Sud-Ouest, Brocol, Cahors, Cot de Cheragas, Cote verte, Folle noire, Gamay, Gamay 15, Gros Auxerrois, Isabelle, Jan Pierrou, Jan Pierrou, Jasmin, Jean-Pierrou, Mourvedre d’ Afrique, Moutet, Napa Gamay, Noir de Chartres, Panse, Plant de Cros, Plant de la Roxo, Plant du Midi, Quercy, Valdiguer

Gros Auxerrois, Brocol, Napa Gamay, Gamay 15, Gamay of Beaujolais, Valdiguer, Cahors, Jean-Pierrou at Sauzet, Quercy and Noir de Chartres

Wine Name: Valdiguié, Wild Flower (J. Lohr), Gamay Rouge (V Sattui)

Background: Originally from the south of France, the home of this grape is now predominantly California with some limited production in the Languedoc and Provence areas of France. For many years in California it was known as Napa Gamay and was thought to be the Gamay Noir of the Beaujolais region of France. DNA studies have identified it as different than Gamay Noir and since 1997 the names Napa Gamay and Gamay Beaujolais have been banned from wine labels in the U.S.

California Vaildiguié has an excellent fruity style somewhat fuller-bodied and less acidic than most French Beaujolais wines. It is medium bodied with flavors of berries and black cherry.

Classic Brands and Sources: U.S. – Broc Cellars. J. Lohr, V. Sattui, Rochioli, Frog’s Leap, Wilson Foreigner

Characteristics:

Style #1 – California

Body – medium (-)

Acidity – medium

Sweetness – dry but fruity

Tannins – medium

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs well with lighter and medium bodied dishes especially those with some acidity but can also match savory dishes

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Chicken, turkey, salmon, tuna and grilled meats with mild acidic sauce, sausage, pasta with light tomato sauce

Cheese Pairings:
Epiosses, Feta (sheep’s milk), goat cheese, Gouda, Majorero (Spanish hard goat cheese) Mahon, Bucheron (French goat cheese), dry Jack cheese, cream cheese, Gouda, Neufchatel, Pont-L’Eveque, Raclette, Reblochon, Roquefort, Saint-Nectare,Vacherin

See also Light red acidic wine appetizers

Vino Nobile di Montepulciano

  (vee-noh no-BEAL dee moun-tah-pull-chi-AH-noh)
Vino Nobile is made primarily from the Sangiovese grape varietal (known locally as Prugnolo gentile) (minimum 70%), blended with Canaiolo Nero (10%–20%) and small amounts of other local varieties such as Mammolo.

Synonyms: Sangiovese, Prugnolo Gentile

Wine Name: Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, Rosso di Montepulciano

Background: Sangiovese grape is the mainstay grape of central Italy, especially Tuscany.  When used to bottle Vino Nobile, the Sangiovese clone known locally as Prugnolo Gentile, must be at least 70% of the blend. Like many Sangiovese wines it is not very aromatic but has dark fruit tastes, bitter cherries, blueberry, plum, violets, licorice, earthy and dusty. It is acidic with sometimes astringent tannins and medium to full-bodied. It can be similar to a Cabernet Sauvignon but it is much more acidic which pairs well with tomato and vinegar-based Italian cooking.

The aging period for any Vino Nobile di Montepulciano is a minimum of 24 months  (36 months for the riserva wines), of which at least 12 months must be spent in oak barrels.

Classic Brands and Sources: Avignonesi, Contucci, Dei Vino, Poliziano, Valdipiatta

Characteristics:

 

Style #1 – Vino di Tavola (generic Sangiovese)Body – medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

Style #2 – ChiantiBody – medium to medium (+)

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

Style #3 – Brunello di MontalcinoBody – full

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs well with hearty acidic dishes such as red meats cooked in wine or tomato bases

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Olives, tomato-based pasta, roasted meats and game, chicken in wine sauce, mushrooms, pancetta, prosciutto, pizza , smoked meat, cold cuts, salami

Cheese Pairings:
Asiago, Bel Pase, Fontina, Grana, Mozzarella, Parmesan, Pecorino, Provolone, Romano, Taleggio

Appetizer Pairings:

See Appetizers for Vino Nobile di Montalcino

Chianti

  (key-YAHN-tay)
Chianti used to be made from 70% Sangiovese grapes with other red and white grape varietals mandated by law. Now since 1995 it must be 80% Sangiovese grapes and can have up to 100% Sangiovese.
  (san-joh-VAY-zeh)
Synonyms: Sangioveto, Brunello, Prugnolo Gentile, Morellino, Nielluccio (Corsica)

Wine Name: Sangiovese, Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, Rosso di Montalcino, Carmignano, Morellino di Scansano, Sangiovese di Romagna, Tignanello, Flaccionello della Pieve

Background: Sangiovese grape is the mainstay grape of central Italy, especially Tuscany. It is used to produce Chianti, Brunello and Vino Nobile as well as just plain or blended Sangiovese varietals called Super Tuscans. It is not very aromatic but has dark fruit tastes, bitter cherries, blueberry, plum, violets, licorice, earthy and dusty. It is acidic with sometimes astringent tannins and medium to full-bodied. It can be similar to a Cabernet Sauvignon but it is much more acidic which pairs well with tomato and vinegar-based Italian cooking.

Brunello is one of the Italy’s best-known and most expensive wines. It is fuller bodied and more tannic than most Sangiovese wines but it is similarly acidic and not very aromatic. There may be subtle flavors of blackberry, black cherry, black raspberry, chocolate, leather and violets but the late release of the wine after harvest results in less fruit flavors. Generally there is a normale and a riserva bottling. The normale bottles are released on the market 50 months after harvest and the riserva are released a year after the normale.

Classic Brands and Sources:
Sangiovese – Italy – many producers; California – Atlas Peak, Au Bon Climat, Seghesio, Staglin, Shafer, Viansa; Australia – Brown Brothers, Coriole, Crittenden Wines, Scaffidi
Brunello – Valdicava, Casanova di Neri, Eredi Fuligni, Fanti, Mocali, Silvio Narda, La Poderina, Poggio Antico, Castello Romitorio, San Filippo, Terralsole

Characteristics:

Style #1 – Vino di Tavola (generic Sangiovese)

Body – medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

Style #2 – Chianti

Body – medium to medium (+)

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

Style #3 – Brunello di Montalcino

Body – full

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs well with hearty acidic dishes such as red meats cooked in wine or tomato bases

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Olives, tomato-based pasta, roasted meats and game, chicken in wine sauce, mushrooms, pancetta, prosciutto, pizza , smoked meat, cold cuts, salami

Cheese Pairings:
Asiago, Bel Pase, Fontina, Grana Padano, Mozzarella, Parmigiano-Reggiano, Pecorino Romano, Provolone, Taleggio

Appetizer Pairings:

See Appetizers for Chianti

Brunello di Montalcino

  (bruh-NELL-oh dee mount-tal-CHI-noh)
A 100% sangiovese wine from southern Tuscany.
Synonyms: Sangioveto, Brunello, Prugnolo Gentile, Morellino, Nielluccio (Corsica)

Wine Name: Sangiovese, Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, Rosso di Montalcino, Carmignano, Morellino di Scansano, Sangiovese di Romagna, Tignanello, Flaccionello della Pieve

Background: Sangiovese grape is the mainstay grape of central Italy, especially Tuscany. It is used to produce Chianti, Brunello and Vino Nobile as well as just plain or blended Sangiovese varietals called Super Tuscans. It is not very aromatic but has dark fruit tastes, bitter cherries, blueberry, plum, violets, licorice, earthy and dusty. It is acidic with sometimes astringent tannins and medium to full-bodied. It can be similar to a Cabernet Sauvignon but it is much more acidic which pairs well with tomato and vinegar-based Italian cooking.

Brunello is one of the Italy’s best-known and most expensive wines. It is fuller bodied and more tannic than most Sangiovese wines but it is similarly acidic and not very aromatic. There may be subtle flavors of blackberry, black cherry, black raspberry, chocolate, leather and violets but the late release of the wine after harvest results in less fruit flavors. Generally there is a normale and a riserva bottling. The normale bottles are released on the market 50 months after harvest and the riserva are released a year after the normale.

Classic Brands and Sources:
Sangiovese – Italy – many producers; California – Atlas Peak, Au Bon Climat, Seghesio, Staglin, Shafer, Viansa; Australia – Brown Brothers, Coriole, Crittenden Wines, Scaffidi
Brunello – Valdicava, Casanova di Neri, Eredi Fuligni, Fanti, Mocali, Silvio Narda, La Poderina, Poggio Antico, Castello Romitorio, San Filippo, Terralsole

Characteristics:

Style #1 – Vino di Tavola (generic Sangiovese)Body – medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

Style #2 – ChiantiBody – medium to medium (+)

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

Style #3 – Brunello di MontalcinoBody – full

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs well with hearty acidic dishes such as red meats cooked in wine or tomato bases

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Olives, tomato-based pasta, roasted meats and game, chicken in wine sauce, mushrooms, pancetta, prosciutto, pizza , smoked meat, cold cuts, salami

Cheese Pairings:
Asiago, Bel Pase, Fontina, Grana, Mozzarella, Parmesan, Pecorino, Provolone, Romano, Taleggio

Appetizer Pairings:

See Appetizers for Brunello di Montalcino

Sangiovese

  (san-joh-VAY-zeh)
Synonyms: Sangioveto, Brunello, Prugnolo Gentile, Morellino, Nielluccio (Corsica)

Wine Name: Sangiovese, Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, Rosso di Montalcino, Carmignano, Morellino di Scansano, Sangiovese di Romagna, Tignanello, Flaccionello della Pieve

Background: Sangiovese grape is the mainstay grape of central Italy, especially Tuscany. It is used to produce Chianti, Brunello and Vino Nobile as well as just plain or blended Sangiovese varietals called Super Tuscans. It is not very aromatic but has dark fruit tastes, bitter cherries, blueberry, plum, violets, licorice, earthy and dusty. It is acidic with sometimes astringent tannins and medium to full-bodied. It can be similar to a Cabernet Sauvignon but it is much more acidic which pairs well with tomato and vinegar-based Italian cooking.

Brunello is one of the Italy’s best-known and most expensive wines. It is fuller bodied and more tannic than most Sangiovese wines but it is similarly acidic and not very aromatic. There may be subtle flavors of blackberry, black cherry, black raspberry, chocolate, leather and violets but the late release of the wine after harvest results in less fruit flavors. Generally there is a normale and a riserva bottling. The normale bottles are released on the market 50 months after harvest and the riserva are released a year after the normale.

Classic Brands and Sources:
Sangiovese – Italy – many producers; California – Atlas Peak, Au Bon Climat, Seghesio, Staglin, Shafer, Viansa; Australia – Brown Brothers, Coriole, Crittenden Wines, Scaffidi
Brunello – Valdicava, Casanova di Neri, Eredi Fuligni, Fanti, Mocali, Silvio Narda, La Poderina, Poggio Antico, Castello Romitorio, San Filippo, Terralsole

Characteristics:

Style #1 – Vino di Tavola (generic Sangiovese)

Body – medium

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

Style #2 – Chianti

Body – medium to medium (+)

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high

Style #3 – Brunello di Montalcino

Body – full

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs well with hearty acidic dishes such as red meats cooked in wine or tomato bases

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Olives, tomato-based pasta, roasted meats and game, chicken in wine sauce, mushrooms, pancetta, prosciutto, pizza , smoked meat, cold cuts, salami

Cheese Pairings:
Asiago, Bel Pase, Fontina, Grana, Mozzarella, Parmesan, Pecorino, Provolone, Romano, Taleggio

Refosco

  (REE-fo-sko)
Synonyms: Cagnina, Dolcedo Blau, Drobni Rifoshk, Grosse Syrah, Mercouri, Merkouri, Refasco, Refosca, Refoschino, Refosco del Pedunculo Rosso, Refosk, Refosko, Refousco, Rephousko, Rifosco, Rifoshk Debeli, Riphosko, Schittierer

Wine Name: Refosco, the best known variety being the Refosco dal Pedunculo Rosso (“Refosco with the red stem”)

Background: Refosco is a dark-skinned grape of northeastern Italy, Slovenia and Croatia especially the Friuli Venezia Giulia region that produces a rich, tannic dark purple wine with black currant and plum flavors. It is moderately acidic and sometimes has a slight bitter finish. There are different varietals of Refosco grown so it is more a family of wines which includes Terrano, Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso, Refosco dal Peduncolo Verde, Refosco Nostrano, Cagnina, Teran, Refosco d’Istria, Refosk, Sangue del Carso, rather than always from one distinct grape.

This grape was well known in antiquity, praised by Pliny the Elder in the first century for the quality of wine it produced. The famous Giacomo Casanova liked Refosco wine and included mention of it in his memoirs.

Classic Brands and Sources: La Castelada, Dorigo, Marco Feluga, Gravner, Jermann, Livon, Rhonchi di Cialla, Rhonchi di Manzano, Franco Terpin, Villa Russiz, Villanova, Volpe Pasini (Italy); Bonny Doon, Montevina (USA)

Characteristics:

Style #1 – Typical Italian
Body – medium (+)
Acidity – medium (+) / high
Sweetness – bone dry
Tannins – prominent but can be harsh

 

 

 

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines: 

Pairs with full-bodied dishes such as red meats that have acidic sauces or marinades and ample salt and fat. The palate cleansing effect of its acidity are often used for first and second courses with a distinct taste, such as roast pork, game, rich minestrone, meat ravioli and lasagna.

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Pairs with sausages, cold cuts, game, beef and grilled meats usually with an acidic sauce or marinade

Cheese Pairings:
Asiago (aged), blue cheese/gorgonzola, Castelmagno, Fontina, Gouda, Parmesan, Pecorino, sharp Cheddar

See also Pinot Noir Appetizers with medium (+) body style for Appetizers to go with Refosco

Montepulciano

  (mon-te-pull-chay-AH-no)
Synonyms: Cordicso, Cordiscio, Cordisco, Cordisio, Monte Pulciano, Montepulciano Cordesco, Montepulciano di Torre de Passeri, Montepulciano Primatico, Morellone, Premutico, Primaticcio, Primutico, Sangiovese Cardisco, Sangiovese Cordisco, Sangiovetto, Torre dei Passeri, Uva Abruzzese and Uva Abruzzi

Wine Name: Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Molise Rosso, Rosso Conero (a blend with up to 15% Sangiovese), Rosso Picento (a blend with 30-50% Sangiovese),

Background: This grape is predominantly grown in eastern Abruzzo, Marche, Molise, and Umbria regions of Italy. It is different than the Vino Nobile di Montepulciano grape from Tuscany. It is a low acid grape, with soft tannins. Flavors and aromas include blackberries, plums and spice. Some might consider the Montepulciano similar to Merlot wines.

Classic Brands and Sources: Cornacchia, Garofoli, Illuminati, Masciarelli, Moroder, Nicodemi, Saladini, Pilastri, Le Terrazze, Umani Ronchi

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical (Italian source)

Body – medium

Acidity – medium (-)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
A low acid wine that pairs well with savory dishes similar to pairings with Merlot

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Game, duck, lamb, sausages both savory and spiced, smoked ham, grilled and roasted meats especially with herbs, mushrooms, paella, cheese and tomato based pasta, root vegetables and beans

Cheese Pairings:
American, Colby, Mild cheddar, Velveeta, Double Glouchester (similar to mild cheddar), Fontina, Gouda, Mahon, Manchego, Monterey Jack, Roncal, Serena, Triple Creme, St André, Zamarano (Spanish sheep’s milk cheese), Brie and Camembert (without rinds)

See also Appetizers that pair with Merlot.

Mencia

  (MEHN-cee-ah or MEHN-thee-ah)
Synonyms: Fernao Pires Tinta, Giao, Jaen, Jaen Galego, Loureiro Tinto, Negra, Negro, Tinto Mencia, Tinto Mollar

Wine Name: Mencia

Background: Mencia is a northwestern Spain red grape similar in characteristics to Cabernet Franc although slightly more acidic and tannic. It is the main red grape in the Bierzo region but also grown in Valdeorras, Ribeira Sacra and some other areas of Spain.

Mencia usually has a raspberry herbal flavor, with some floral aromatics and spicy or black pepper finish.

Classic Brands and Sources: Amizade, Benaza, Descendientes de José Palacios, Dominio de Tares, Moure, Priorato de Pantó, Telmo Rodriguez, Vire dos Remedios

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical

Body – medium

Acidity – medium (+)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium (+)


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs with acidic foods and lighter meats with acidic sauces or marinades

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Pair with lighter red meats, fowl, chicken and shellfish especially when cooked in wine or with a wine or tomato sauce. Predominantly sweet or fruity dishes should be avoided.

Cheese Pairings:
Feta, goat cheese, Gouda, Majorero, Mahon, Bucheron, dry Jack cheese, Gouda, Neufchatel, Pont-L’Eveque, Raclette, Reblochon, Roquefort, Saint-Nectare,Vacherin

Dolcetto

 (dohl-CHET-oh)
Synonyms: Acqui, Barbirono, Bathiolin, Batialin, Beina, Bignola, Bignona, Bignonia, Bignonina, Bourdon noir, Cassolo, Charbonneau, Charbono, Chasselas noir, Cote rouge Merille, Crete de Coq, Debili Rifosk, Dolcedo Rotstieliger, Dolceto, Dolcetta nera, Dolcetto a Raspe Verde, Dolcetto a Raspo Rosso, Dolcetto nero, Dolcetto Piemontese, Dolchetto, Dolcino nero, Dolciut, Dolsin, Dolsin Raro, Dolzin, Dolzino, Dosset, Gros noir de Montelimar, Gros Plant, Maennlicher Refosco, Mauvais noir, Montelimar, Monteuse, Montmelian, Mosciolino, Nera Dolce, Nibio, Noirin d’ Espagne, Nord du Lot et Garonne, Ocanette, Orincasca, Ormeasca, Ormeasco, Pico rouge, Pico rouge, Plant de Calarin, Plant de Chapareillan, Plant de Moirans, Plant de Montmelian, Plant de Provence, Plant de Savoie, Plant de Turin, Plant du Roi, Premasto, Primaticcio, Primativo, Primitivo Nero, Promotico, Provencal, Ravanellino, Refork, Refork Debeli, Refork Male, Refosk Debeli, Rotstieliger Dolcedo, Savoyard, Turin, Turino, Uva d’ Acqui, Uva d’ Acquia, Uva del Monferrato, Uva di Ovada, Uva di Roccagrimalda

Wine Name: Dolcetto d’ Alba, Dolcetto d’Acqui, and the DOCG areas (highest quality designation) of Dolcetto d’ Dogliani, Dolcetto d’ Diano d’Alba, and Dolcetto di Ovada, (Piedmonte); Ormeasco (Liguria)

Background: This is an everyday, early release, easy drinking wine of the Langhe region in Piedmont Italy, similar to France’s Beaujolais wine except that it is low acid rather than high acid. It has cherry, black cherry, and currant flavors with undertones of chocolate along with a slightly bitter finish. The low acidity makes it very suitable for pairing with savory, buttery or creamy dishes. Dolcetto di Dogliani and Dolcetto di Ovada are the best, fullest bodied examples.

Classic Brands and Sources: Italy – Altare, Domenico Clerico, Aldo Conterno, Bruno Giacosa, Pio Cesare, Renato Ratti, La Spinetta, Vietti, Abbona, Boschis, M. Marengo, Massolino, Chionetti, Luigi Einaudi, Oddero, Pecchenino, Cascina Scarsi Olivi

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical

Body – medium

Acidity – low to medium (-)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – medium – medium(+)

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Generally a medium bodied food wine that goes well with savory, herbed and spiced dishes, although the somewhat higher tannins help offset salt and fat

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Game, duck, lamb, sausages both savory and spiced, smoked ham, grilled and roasted meats especially with herbs, mushrooms, paella, cheese based pasta, root vegetables and beans

Cheese Pairings:
American, Colby, Mild cheddar, Velveeta, Double Glouchester (similar to mild cheddar), Fontina, Gouda, Mahon, Manchego, Monterey Jack, Roncal, Serena, Triple Creme, St André, Zamarano (Spanish sheep’s milk cheese), Brie and Camembert (without rinds)

Appetizer Pairings:

See Appetizers to Pair with Dolcetto

 

1 4 5 6 7 8 12